Increase disk partition size when windows disk manager has extend disk grayed out

Firstly, extend volume with Diskpart.exe

To extend volume with diskpart.exe, you just need to open up Command line utility with Administrators rights (Start -> right click CMD and choose run as administrator). Type Diskpart and the utility fires up.

  1. Open a command prompt and type diskpart.
  2. At the DISKPART prompt, type list volume. Make note of the basic volume you want to extend.
  3. At the DISKPART prompt, type select volume <volumenumber>. This selects the basic volume volumenumber that you want to extend into contiguous, empty space on the same disk.
  4. At the DISKPART prompt, type extend [size=<size>]. This extends the selected volume by size megabytes (MB).

Moreover, you can use this commands like: Delete partition, Format and more – you can read further on over here.

Adding a Diskshelf14mk2 to my Netapp FAS2050 SAN. Assigning disks, iSCSI shares for windows and NFS Shares for VMWare. All with the smallest amount of CLI.

First of all, my NetApp FAS2050 SAN is brilliant. It built like a tank and hasn’t let me down. We purchased it a few years ago, when 1TB seemed like all we would ever need.  Now 1TB is nowhere near enough storage. This is why we purchased an additional shelf with 14TB (pre RAID). We went for the DiskShelf14mk2 and we thought we would do the implmentation in house to reduce costs….How hard can it be?

So, the NetApps documentation is CRAP!

1. First of all you have to set the shelf ID. By default, the main Netapps FAS2050 header unit has an ID of 0. Every shelf you add should increment by 1. To do this there is a switch on the back of the shelf:-

After reading around on the web, I think they come out of the factory set to one.

2. Plugging it in you think would be the easiest think in the world. Here’s a clue NetApp PROVIDE SOME DOCUMENTATION! Trying to figure this out from what you give me is like trying to do The Times crossword. I had to search the internet for 2 hours for this BASIC information. Here is a photo of how it goes in (no redundency at present).

To recap, thats:-

Top SAN Header  0a —- top Shelf 0b

Bottom SAN Header 0a —- bottom Shelf 0b

2. Ok, now, when I logged into the SAN onTap software I could see the 16 disks, all listed as unowned. No problem, I’ll just look in the NetApp….Oh no, wait… Did I mention the documentation is as useful as a chocolate teapot?

After a further 2 hours searching the web I found this. I had to do a little of CLI here:-

Login with putty or another SSH client:-

SHow the disks that are not owned. Yes, they do change the terminology in the CLI….Just to confuse everyone. Nice work! No really!

FAS2050A> disk show -n
DISK       OWNER                  POOL   SERIAL NUMBER
———— ————-          —–  ————-
0c.00.16     Not Owned              NONE   3SL0N4JZ00009044DC1R

Now you can assign each of the not owned disks to a controller.

disk assign 0c.00.16 -o FAS2050A

I did this one by one for all 16

At this point I can go back to the the web interface.

Building a Volume

Pretty easy. Just goto Volume – Add and follow the wizard. Assign the new disks to the volume

Building a QTree

Again, very easy. Just folow the wizard

Adding an Aggregate

Again, very easy. Just folow the wizard

Adding a LUN

Again, very easy. Just folow the wizard. For iSCSI Windows interfaces

NFS

Again, very easy. Just folow the wizard. For VMWare environments.